Skip to main content

Plant And Wildlife Sciences

data-content-type="article"

Ph.D. Graduate Shares His Passion for the Outdoors with the Next Generation of Students

April 18, 2021
For BYU Ph.D. graduate Steve Bates, the popular tune “Home on the Range” hits close to home. Since 1999, Bates has worked as the wildlife manager at Antelope Island State Park in Utah, and he knows a thing or two about the land “where the buffalo roam.” He’s accustomed to the dazzling sunrises and picturesque settings the island offers – and he’s dedicated much of his life to researching, preserving and protecting the wildlife living there.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Fighting fire with seeds: BYU restoring scorched landscapes after devastating wildfires

October 14, 2020
Catastrophic fires in the West are burning hotter than ever, leaving paths of destruction through both human development and native plant ecosystems. Seed coating technology from BYU is helping restore native plant systems.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU professor discovers new wildflower, working to make it widely available

May 06, 2020
“When I saw it, bells and whistles went off in my head; I sat there for two or three minutes quite stunned at its beauty,” said Mikel Stevens, a professor of plant and wildlife sciences. “It’s extremely rare. If I were to put numbers on this, I would put the chance of finding it as one in millions.”
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Polar bear den detection methods work less than half the time, finds BYU bear expert

March 12, 2020
On the ground observation finds 55% of dens are missed
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU study: Wildfires increase winter snowpack — but that isn’t necessarily a good thing

February 04, 2020
Deep in the Tushar mountains, some three hours south of BYU’s campus, Ph.D. student Jordan Maxwell and two other students found themselves in deep snow, both literally and figuratively.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Analysis of butterfly genomes reveals answers to complex evolutionary history questions

October 31, 2019
Researchers from BYU and Harvard published a pivotal study in Science magazine.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU scientists discover way to make crops grow in salt-damaged soil

August 22, 2019
A group of BYU researchers may have found a way to reverse falling crop yields caused by increasingly salty farmlands throughout the world.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Water cycle diagrams are giving us a false sense of water security

June 10, 2019
New study finds texbook depictions need to be updated to show human impact
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Study finds bedrock is teeming with microorganisms protecting water quality

February 03, 2019
Nitrogen pollution from human fertilizer and fossil fuels affects two-thirds of freshwater bodies worldwide and causes billions of dollars of damage to fisheries and ecosystems annually. It triggers harmful algal blooms and dead zones where only worms and bacteria can survive.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU professors, students helping reverse demise of critical bird species

October 11, 2018
Greater sage grouse is an indicator of healthy western ecosystems
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Saving the world's water (and humans) one little stream at a time

January 16, 2018
Research by BYU ecosystem ecologist Ben Abbott presents a new tool to fight nutrient pollution. His study found that streams can be used as “sensors” of ecosystem health, allowing both improved water quality and food production.

overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU scientists help sequence genome of quinoa, potential 'grain of the future'

February 07, 2017
Researchers at BYU were major contributors to the first fully successful effort to sequence the genome of quinoa—a grain experts believe may hold the key to feeding the world’s growing population.

overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

This desert plant defies gravity by collecting water upside-down with tiny leaf hairs

June 05, 2016
Syntrichia caninervis (aka seriously awesome desert moss) uses tiny hair-like structures on its leaves to absorb water from the atmosphere until droplets form and flow to the leaf. And sometimes it does it upside-down.

overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection= overrideCardHideByline= overrideCardHideDescription= overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=