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Intellect

What's New at BYU for November 2009

What’s New at BYU for November 2009

Sunday, Nov. 1

President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, Second Counselor in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, will speak at a Church Educational System fireside at 6 p.m. in the Marriott Center. It will be broadcast live on BYU Television. For rebroadcast information, visit byub.org.

Sunday, Nov. 1 and Tuesday, Nov. 3

BYU Broadcasting has announced rebroadcast dates and times for the Oct. 27 forum address presented by Greg Mortenson, co-founder of the Central Asia Institute and founder of Pennies for Peace and author of the best-sellering "Three Cups of Tea." The forum will be rebroadcast on BYU Television Nov. 1 at 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. and Nov. 3 at 8 p.m. It will also be rebroadcast on KBYU-TV (Channel 11) Nov. 1 at 6 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. All times are Mountain Standard Time. For more information, visit byub.org.

Monday, Nov. 2

The Annual Christmas Booktalk — “Books for Christmas Giving” — will take place from 4-5 p.m. in the BYU Bookstore main floor. The event is free and all attendees will receive a free book list. Janice Card is the presenter.

Tuesday, Nov. 3

Elder Walter F. Gonzalez, a member of the Presidency of the Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, will speak at a devotional at 11:05 a.m. at the Marriott Center. The devotional will be broadcast live on the BYU Broadcasting channels. Visit byub.org/devotionals or speeches.byu.edu for rebroadcast and archive information.

Wednesday, Nov. 4

C. Randall Paul, founder and president of the Foundation for Interreligious Diplomacy, will speak at a David M. Kennedy Center lecture at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Thursday, Nov. 5

Canadian author and critic Tim Wynne-Jones will be presenting “Between Belonging and Otherness: The Book as Passport” at the Annual Nan Osmond Grass Lecture sponsored by the BYU English Department at 11 a.m. in B-192 Joseph F. Smith Building.

Rebecca de Schweinitz, a professor of history at BYU, will be presenting “Civil Rights Stories: Childhood, Brown and America’s Struggle for Racial Equality” at an American Studies Lecture at 11 a.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium.

“Blast!” the movie that tells the story of NASA’s new telescope launched by a high-altitude balloon, will be screened at 5 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium. Admission is free.

Friday, Nov. 6

Kenneth Crews, copyright scholar at Columbia University, will discuss “Navigating through the Copyright Maze: Basics and Beyond,” from 9 a.m. to noon in the Assembly Hall of the Gordon B. Hinckley Alumni and Visitors Center. This workshop will address copyright issues particular to library and higher education settings. Participants are encouraged to bring their questions and prepare for a lively discussion of the importance of copyright to their work. For more information, contact Susie Quartey at (801) 422-4467.

The David M. Kennedy Center will be hosting a European Studies Symposium, “Berlin,” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building. For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Women’s Services and Resources will host “Speed Dating” at 6:30 p.m. in the Garden Court of the Wilkinson Student Center. Admission is free, and all are welcome to attend. For more information, visit wsr.byu.edu.

Thursday and Friday, Nov. 5-6

The BYU Center for Economic Self-Reliance will be hosting the 12th Annual Economic Self-Reliance Conference, “Social Entrepreneurship and Self-Reliance,” in the BYU Conference Center. Registration for the conference is $185. Registration discounts are available for large groups, BYU faculty and staff and college or high school students. For more information on the conference and to register, visit esrconference.byu.edu.

Monday, Nov. 9

The Honorable A. Anne McLellan, former deputy prime minister of Canada, will be presenting “The Future of North American Relations; The Three Amigos: A Friendship Worth Saving?" at the Annual Asael E. and Maydell C. Palmer Canadian Studies Lecture at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Tuesday, Nov. 10

Elder Jon M. Huntsman, Sr., founder and chairman of the Huntsman Corporation and Area Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, will present a campus devotional at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center. The devotional will be broadcast live on the BYU Broadcastingchannels. Visit byub.org/devotionals or speeches.byu.edu for rebroadcast and archive information.

Thursday, Nov. 12

BYU’s Office Professionals Advisory Committee will be hosting a brown bag lecture, “Getting Our Financial Houses in Order,” by Ned C. Hill at 12:05 p.m. in 3211 Wilkinson Student Center. Hill served as dean of the Marriott School of Management at BYU from 1998 to 2008. Attendees should bring their own lunch. For more information on this and other OPAC events, contact Hannah Dimond at (801) 422-8257.

Darren Hawkins, chair of the BYU Political Science Department, will deliver the Phi Kappa Phi Distinguished Lecture, “Have I Done Any Good in the World? Achieving the Impossible in Foreign Affairs,” at 11 a.m. in 3380 WSC.

Ramona Hopkins, chair of the BYU Department of Psychology will deliver the annual Alice Louise Reynolds Women in Scholarship Lecture, “I Just Can’t Think Straight: Critical Illness and Why the Brain Matters,” at 2 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium.

Friday, Nov. 13

The BYU Rollins Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology will be hosting the Omniture Web Analytics Competition Intercollegiate Finals at 1 p.m. in the W-408 N. Eldon Tanner Building. This event will showcase teams from BYU and the U of U battling for more than $20,000 in cash and prizes.

Tuesday Nov. 17

Noah Feldman, professor of law at Harvard Law School, will speak at a Brigham Young University forum at 11:00 a.m. in the Marriott Center. The forum will be broadcast live on the BYU Broadcasting channels. It will not be rebroadcast or reprinted.

Tuesday through Friday, Nov. 17_20

BYU’s International Services will be hosting World Fest 2009, a celebration of international cultures and people, in the Wilkinson Student Center during International Education Week. Students, faculty and community members are invited to participate in daily events. Details are available at internationalservices.byu.edu.

Thursday, Nov. 19

The BYU Geography Department will be hosting the Annual Chauncey Harris Lecture at 11 a.m. in 250 Spencer W. Kimball Tower. Kenneth Young, a geography professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder, will be the speaker.

Women’s Services and Resources will be hosting a Returned Missionary Training Conference, “Is There Life After a Mission? The Best is Yet to Come,” at 11 a.m. in 3220 Wilkinson Student Center.

Matthew Wickman will deliver a Harold B. Lee Library House of Learning Lecture titled “Robert Burns and the Inhuman: Mice, Lice ... Numbers ... Networks” at 2 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium.

“Trouble the Water,” winner of the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival, will be screened at 5 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium. Admission is free.

Friday, Nov. 20

The David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies will be presenting "From Boston to Bolivia: Closing the Cultural Gap by Practicing Anthropology in Health Development Programs” at an International Field Studies Lecture at 1 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

The BYU Motion Picture Archives will screen “The Flame and the Arrow,” a 1950 Technicolor classic with Burt Lancaster and Virginia Mayo, at 7 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium. Admission is free.

The BYU Department of Mechanical Engineering will be hosting a “Nephi’s Steel Bow Competition” from 4 to 6 p.m. in the North University Intramural Field. The event is open to all full-time BYU students, and they do not have to be involved in the mechanical engineering program. Students will design and build bows that will be judged on engineering design and performance.

All Month

Each Tuesday, Women's Services and Resources will host “Food For Thought,” a discussion to help participants achieve and maintain a healthy weight, at noon in 3250 Wilkinson Student Center.

Each Friday at noon, the English Department will host a reading series in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium. The event is free, and the public is invited to attend. For more information, visit english.byu.edu.

Each Friday at noon, the Biology Department will host EcoLunch seminars in 403 John A. Widtsoe Building. For more information, visit biology.byu.edu/home.

Every Wednesday at 11 a.m., children ages 10 and younger can enjoy story time at the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum, where they will hear stories about animals and nature read by a professional storyteller. Live animals will also be showcased. The event is free each week, and registration is not necessary. For more information, call the museum at (801) 422-5051 or visit mlbean.byu.edu.

Children ages 5-12 are welcome at Saturday Safari at the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum. Each Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to noon, participants will be transported around the globe, visiting rain forests, deep ocean trenches, deserts and more, while learning about the animals that inhabit each place. Registration is $12 for the first child in a family and $10 for each additional child. Register at least one week in advance as late registration is not accepted. For more information or to register, call the museum at (801) 422-5051. Additional details are available at mlbean.byu.edu.

The Museum of Peoples and Cultures, located at 700 N. 100 East in Provo, presents the exhibit “New Lives: Building Community at Fourmile Ruin.” This exhibit explores an ancient abandoned pueblo in Arizona that was built by native inhabitants. Another exhibit, “Kachinas of the Southwest: Dances, Dolls and Rain,” explores the Hopi religious ceremonies. The museum offers children’s programs as well as various date nights, family home evenings and cultural events. Teaching kits and tours are available, and volunteers are always welcome. Museum hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Hours are extended until 7 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. For more information, call (801) 422-0020 or visit mpc.byu.edu.

The BYU Museum of Paleontology, formerly the Earth Science Museum, was recently expanded to display most of its collection. Now, with the new 5,000 square-foot addition, the museum features a replica of a 9-foot-long triceratops skull from Montana, dinosaur bones found last summer near Moab, a Cretaceous nest, dinosaur skeletons of a camptosaurus and an allosaurus and a mural of the Utah-Colorado region in the Jurassic Period. Visitors can touch real fossils and view fossils being prepared in the active laboratory. The museum, located at 1683 N. Canyon Road in Provo, is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday with extended “Family Night” hours on Mondays from 6 to 9 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, call (801) 422-3680.

The Royden G. Derrick Planetarium at BYU’s Eyring Science Center offers evening shows hosted by the BYU Astronomical Society. Tickets will go on sale at the planetarium door starting at 6:30 p.m. and are $2 each. For a schedule of shows and more information, visit planetarium.byu.edu.

The Family History Library at the Harold B. Lee Library at BYU offers free family history classes the second and fourth Sunday of each month. The classes begin at 3 p.m., 4:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. The library’s family history resources and consultants are available from 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. on these Sundays. For more information and a complete schedule of classes, visit www.lib.byu.edu/fslab/classes.html.

Complimentary tours of the BYU campus are available weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Gordon B. Hinckley Alumni and Visitors Center. For more information, call (801) 422-4678.

Writer: Ricardo Castro

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