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Intellect

U.S. Embassy officer in Kazakhstan to speak at BYU July 7

A United States embassy official in Kazakhstan will discuss his responsibilities as a Foreign Service officer Wednesday, July 7, at 10 a.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building on the Brigham Young University campus.

Acting public affairs officer Stephen A. Guice will speak at the lecture, part of the new Secretary's Hometown Diplomats Program sponsored by the U.S. State Department.

The program is designed to show Americans why they should care about what happens around the world through the stories and experiences of Foreign Service and Civil Service personnel.

Guice has been serving as the cultural affairs officer at the U.S. embassy in Almaty, Kazakhstan, since September 2002. Before his embassy appointment, Guice taught university English and applied linguistics for 17 years.

He was a senior Fulbright scholar in Romania from 1994-96. His father was also a Fulbright scholar in Peru when Guice was a child.

He received bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees in linguistics from Michigan State University.

The lecture is sponsored by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies. The center archives lectures and posts a calendar online at http://kennedy.byu.edu.

For more information about this or other lectures, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Lee Simon

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