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Intellect

Synthesis hosts guest artist Phil Markowitz Nov. 17 at BYU

The Brigham Young University jazz ensemble Synthesis with guest artist Phil Markowitz will perform under the direction of Ray Smith Wednesday, Nov. 17 at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

Tickets are $9 with $3 off with a student ID. For tickets call the Fine Arts Ticket Office at (801) 378-4322 or visit http://performances.byu.edu.

Markowitz has received many awards for his jazz music including composition awards from the Howard Foundation, the New York Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Doris Duke Foundation. He received his bachelor's degree from the Eastman School of Music.

He has performed at the Bergamo Jazz Festival, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Tucson Jazz Society and the Center for the Performing Arts at Pace University.

Synthesis will perform various songs including George Gershwin's "But Not for Me," Pat Metheny's "See the World" and Gordon Goodwin's "Count Bubba."

Synthesis combines swing, blues, jazz, pop, Latin, funk and fusion styles into a feast of jazz entertainment.

They perform every year at national and international jazz festivals, including the North Sea Jazz Festival and the Antibes Jazz Festival in France.

For more information contact Ray Smith at (801) 422-3391.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

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