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Intellect

Supervisors can nominate students for BYU Student Employee of the Year

Brigham Young University supervisors can recognize exceptional student employees who have demonstrated outstanding achievement in the workplace by nominating them for BYU Student Employee of the Year.

To be eligible, student nominees must have completed or will expect to complete at least three months of full-time or six months of part-time employment from June 1, 2005-May 31, 2006.

Nominations will be accepted from Jan. 3-Feb. 3, 2006. Interested supervisors can fill out a nomination form at http://www.byu.edu/hr/se/ (choose Student Employee of the Year).

A committee organized by Student Life and Employment Services will select a candidate to submit to a regional and state competition sponsored by the Western Association of Student Employment Administrators.

All nominees will receive a certificate of appreciation. Previous years’ recipients have found that this recognition of exceptional work experience a useful addition to their resumes.

National Student Employment Week will be celebrated on the BYU campus April 10-14, 2006.

BYU is a member of the Western Association of Student Employment Administrators, an organization involved in the critical issues and challenges facing student employment.

For more information, contact Carol B. Stott at the BYU Student Employment Office, 422-8905.

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