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Intellect

Scott Woodward featured at Family History Fireside Oct. 11

Brigham Young University's Center for Family History and Genealogy will sponsor its annual Family History Fireside Friday (Oct. 11) at 7:30 p.m. in the Joseph Smith Building Auditorium.

The featured speaker, Scott R. Woodward, will discuss genealogy reconstruction using DNA samples from around the world. The public is welcome to attend.

Currently the director of the BYU Center for Molecular Genealogy, Woodward has seen his work highlighted internationally on Good Morning America and the Discovery and Learning Channels. He has directed the genetic and molecular analysis of Egyptian royal mummies in Seila, Egypt, and analyzed the DNA from ancient manuscripts, including the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Woodward has also been the scholar-in-residence at the BYU Center for Near Eastern Studies in Jerusalem and a visiting professor at Hebrew University.

While conducting postdoctoral work in molecular genetics at the University of Utah, Woodward discovered a genetic marker used for the identification of the cystic fibrosis gene. He also helped isolate the gene markers for colon cancer and neurofibromatosis.

Writer: Craig Kartchner

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