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Intellect

Replica of Wright Brothers' plane on display at BYU April 2-3

To mark the 100th anniversary of powered flight, a futuristic replica of the Wright Brother's 1905 plane will be on display Wednesday and Thursday (April 2 and 3) at Brigham Young University.

The display, located on the corner of 900 E. and 1650 North St. in Provo, is free and will be available beginning at 11 a.m. on Wednesday until 6 p.m. on Thursday.

A group of Utah State University students and faculty in the College of Engineering spent more than 10,000 hours building the replica. Former U.S. Senator Jake Garn will fly the plane along a historic route at the Inventing Flight Celebration in Dayton, Ohio, in July.

The plane's display is part of the Central Utah Science and Engineering Fair that is running the same week. BYU's David O. McKay School of Education is sponsoring the fair. More than 600 young scientists will compete for awards and prizes at the fair.

In addition to the fair, students will be celebrating the theme, "On the Wings of an Idea," by participating in activities geared to highlight the centennial anniversary of flight.

The Central Utah Science and Engineering Fair is dedicated to promoting science education and rewarding student achievement in science.

For more information, please contact Lisa Clarke at (801) 422-1987.

Writer: Liesel Enke

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