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Psychologist Martin Seligman at BYU forum March 24

Director of the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania

Martin Seligman, a professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, will speak at a Brigham Young University forum Tuesday, March 24, at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center.

The forum will be broadcast live on the BYU Broadcasting channels. Visit byub.org/devotionals or speeches.byu.edu for rebroadcast and archive information

A world-renowned authority on depression and abnormal psychology, Seligman is known for his work on the theory of “learned helplessness.” He is also the director of the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Former president of the American Psychological Association, he is the founding editor-in-chief of Prevention and Treatment Magazine and is on the board of advisers of Parents.

He is the recipient of two Distinguished Scientific Contribution awards from the American Psychological Association, the Laurel Award of the American Association for Applied Psychology and Prevention and the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Society for Research in Psychopathology.

Seligman has written and lectured around the world about positive psychology topics including “The Optimistic Child,” “Learned Optimism” and “Authentic Happiness.” His research on preventing depression received the MERIT Award of the National Institute of Mental Health in 1991. He is the network director of the Positive Psychology Network and Scientific Director of the Classification of Strengths and Virtues Project of the Mayerson Foundation. Since 2000, his main mission has been the promotion of the field of positive psychology.

He received a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Princeton University and a doctorate in psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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