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Intellect

Popular “A Celebration of Christmas” at BYU Nov. 30, Dec. 1

The Brigham Young University Combined Choirs and Philharmonic Orchestra will present their annual Christmas concert, “A Celebration of Christmas,” Friday, Nov. 30, at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 1, at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

Tickets are available for general audiences for $16 with $1 off for seniors and alumni and $5 off for students. Tickets are available at the Harris Fine Arts Ticket Office, 801-422-4322 or online at byuarts.com/tickets.

All four of BYU’s auditioned choirs – Men’s Chorus, Women’s Chorus, Concert Choir and BYU Singers – will perform separate numbers and one number together, “Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus.”

The choirs will be joined by the Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Kory Katseanes and a "group sing-a-long" of carols with the audience. The concert will end with “God Rest Ye Merry Gentleman,” “Once in Royal David’s City” and “The First Noel” performed by all the groups together.

For more information, contact Ken Crossley at (801) 422-9348 or ken_crossley@byu.edu.

Writer: Preston Wittwer

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