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Intellect

Mozart's "The Magic Flute" celebrated in BYU Studies-sponsored seminar Nov. 16

A unique event featuring three panel discussions hosted by BYU Studies and consisting of faculty from more than 10 academic departments will discuss parallels between Mozart, Mormons, Masonry and "The Magic Flute" on Tuesday, Nov. 16, from noon to 4:30 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium.

The event is free and open to the public.

Highlights from the opera will be screened in the first hour of the event to help preface the discussion.

This event is in conjunction with the special issue of BYU Studies, a Brigham Young University-based academic journal, dedicated to the study of Mozart's "The Magic Flute" and its similarities with Mormonism and Masonry.

"We are proud to publish special issues that take an in-depth look at important and fascinating subjects," said John W. Welch, director of BYU Studies. "In Mozart's 'The Magic Flute' we encounter crucial topics of Western civilization. Significantly, Mozart lived around the time of the American Revolution and the birth of Joseph Smith. Latter-day Saints have found and will find many points of interest in this classic opera."

Professors who contributed their research and analysis to the special edition of the journal will present their findings during the three panel discussion period.

Topics covered by those participating in the event include "Historical Contexts for Mozart and The Magic Flute," "Mozart and the Moral World of 'The Magic Flute'" and "Receiving 'The Magic Flute' on Stage, Page, Poster, and Film."

"It [The opera] locates striking parallels to LDS doctrines such as eternal marriage and the exalting potential of divine love," said Paul Kerry, guest editor of the BYU Studies special edition. "It can be read as an allegory of life's journey and a pattern relating to the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints about the plan of salvation."

Professors participating in the event include Hans-Wilhelm Kelling, Gideon Burton, Harrison Powley, Michael Lyon, Kaye Hanson, John Fowles, Paul Kerry, Lawrence Vincent, Robert McFarland, Dean Duncan and Philipp Malzl.

For more information contact Jim Summerhays at (801) 422-8608 or visit http://byustudies.byu.edu.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

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