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Intellect

Lawrence Green to present BYU guitar recital Feb. 12

Lawrence Green, Brigham Young University’s resident guitar faculty member, will be performing with baritone Arden Hopkin and guitarist Justin Leslie in a recital Saturday, Feb. 12, at 1:30 p.m. in the Museum of Art Auditorium. 

Admission is free. This performance was originally scheduled for the Madsen Recital Hall. 

Green will be performing a dozen classical guitar pieces, including solo guitar performances, three guitar duets assisted by Leslie and four duets with Hopkin.

The works include “Serenata Española” by Joaquin Malats, Variations on a Theme by Mozart, Op. 9, “Farewell to Stromness” by Peter Maxwell-Davies; Danse Espagnole, No. 1 (La Vie Brève), by Manuel de Falla; and Green’s special arrangement of the traditional folksong “Carmen Carmela.”

Green is fluent in many guitar styles including classical, rock, jazz and country. He earned degrees in music performance from BYU and Arizona State University and is the author of several guitar instructional books. Born in Washington, D.C., Green grew up in the Maryland and D.C. suburbs playing in rock and blues bands as he studied classical guitar.

He has also performed with the Utah Symphony, Utah Valley Symphony, American Fork Symphony, Tacoma Youth Symphony and is in demand as a chamber player and soloist.

He is a senior lecturer in the School of Music at BYU, where he has been teaching guitar methods since 1982. He teaches more than 700 students a year and developed the school’s guitar program.

For more information about this recital, contact Lawrence Green at (801) 422-3275 or lrmusic@mstarmetro.net. For more information about Green and his guitar method, visit greatbigguitar.com.

Writer: Philip Volmar

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