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Intellect

Karloff, Lugosi and "The Black Cat" at BYU Oct. 28

The Brigham Young University Motion Picture Archive Film Series is looking to spook the campus community this Friday, Oct. 28, at 7 p.m. with the showing of “The Black Cat.”

The event is free and open to the public. Doors to the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium on the first level will open at 6:30 p.m., and the movie will last 65 minutes. Children eight years of age and older are welcome.

Often billed as the “twin titans of horror,” Boris Karloff (the Frankenstein monster in the 1931 classic film) and Bela Lugosi (synonymous with his role as Dracula) were teamed for the first time in this stylish horror thriller.

In a story bearing little resemblance to the Edgar Allan Poe original, Lugosi confronts his old nemesis Karloff, who heads a devil cult in a castle nestled in the mountains near Budapest. A stranded honeymooning couple comes between the two men who have a surprising score to settle in one of the great modestly-budgeted films that distinguished Universal Pictures during the 1930s and 1940s, known subsequently as the “Universal Horrors.”

For more information contact Roger Layton at (801) 422-6687 or roger_layton@byu.edu.

Writer: Charles Krebs

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