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Intellect

Hearst Journalism Awards Program honors BYU broadcast news program

The Brigham Young University Department of Communications' journalism program placed second in the intercollegiate broadcast news competition for the Hearst Journalism Awards Program.

Three students were pivotal in the second-place award because of broadcast work they had done during fall semester.

Mark Allphin, a sophomore from Provo, came in fourth in the radio news competition. He will go on to the semifinals. Melissa Kimball, a senior from Layton, placed sixth in the radio competition, and Kimber Holt, a junior from Granite Bay, Calif., received 12th place in the television news contest.

"We are continuing to raise the bar in student-mentored teaching," said Ed Adams, department chair. "We have innovative faculty and staff who are committed to reaching individuals."

The BYU journalism program finished second behind Northwestern University and ahead of other acclaimed schools such as the University of Florida, University of Missouri and Arizona State University.

The competition was open to students at more than 100 U.S. colleges and universities with accredited journalism programs. Hearst Awards are given in writing, photography, television and radio news and are considered the most prestigious in student journalism. Entrants are judged by panels of media professionals.

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