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Intellect

French ambassador to United States speaks at BYU March 30

The French ambassador to the United States will discuss "France-U.S. Relations" at an Area Focus Lecture Tuesday, March 30, at 2 p.m. in 2084 Jesse Knight Humanities Building on the Brigham Young University campus.

Jean-David Levitte has had a distinguished career in the French Foreign Service, serving in senior positions around the world and for two former French presidents.

Prior to his posting as ambassador, Levitte worked as French permanent representative to the United Nations, having been assigned to the post in 2000 by French President Jacques Chirac.

He also served as Chirac's senior diplomatic adviser from 1995 to 2000.

Levitte worked on the staff of former President Valery Giscard d'Estaing at the Elysee Palace from 1975 to 1981. His career with the French Foreign Service has taken him to such places as Paris, New York, Geneva and Hong Kong.

Contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 for more information, or visit the Kennedy Center Web site at kennedy.byu.edu/events for archived lectures and a calendar of other upcoming events and lectures.

Writer: Lee Simons

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