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Intellect

Family therapist featured at BYU Virginia Cutler Lecture

The College of Family Home and Social Sciences and the School of Family Life will present Robert Stahmann Thursday (Nov. 7) in the 64th annual Virginia Cutler Lecture.

Stahmann, a BYU professor of marriage and family therapy, will discuss clergy and counselor perspectives on traveling the road to marriage at 7 p.m. in 250 Spencer W. Kimball Tower. The public is welcome to attend.

He earned his B.A. in political science from Macalester College in Minnesota, followed by his M.S and Ph.D. degrees in educational and counseling psychology from the University of Utah. In addition to being a consultant for LDS Social Services, he has taught at BYU since 1975 and directed the Marriage and Family Counseling Clinic for 26 years.

Virginia Cutler, a BYU alumna and former faculty member, left an endowment to the university making the lecture series possible. The support of her descendents has continued to make the series a successful way to provide a forum for discussion on family development topics.

Admission to the lecture is free of charge. Please call LaRita Johnson for more information at (801) 422-9094.

Writer: Craig Kartchner

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