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Intellect

Families and Work Research Conference at BYU March 20-22

The Brigham Young University Family Studies Center will sponsor the three-day “Families and Work Research Conference” Monday through Wednesday, March 20-22, in the BYU Conference Center.

Cost for the conference is $229 for noncredit registration and $279 for credit registration. For registration and details, visit ce.byu.edu/cw/familywork/ or call (801) 422-8925.

The conference will cover several topics including arranging flexible work schedules, the influence of fathers’ work conditions on father-child relationships and marital relationships and retirement, among many others.

The conference will also feature presenters from different universities throughout the nation. During lunch on Monday, March 20, conference participants will have the opportunity to meet with the presenters.

The conference will close Wednesday evening with a banquet and keynote presentation.

Writer: Tonya Fischio

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