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Intellect

Emmeline B. Wells topic of annual Reynolds lecture at BYU

Carol Cornwall Madsen, a senior research fellow at the Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Latter-day Saint History at Brigham Young University, will deliver the 10th annual Alice Louise Reynolds Lecture Thursday, April 3, at 2 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium.

Madsen will speak about Emmeline B Wells, an outspoken suffragist and former General Relief Society President during the early years of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Madsen is a recently retired professor of history at BYU. Her work on Emmeline B. Wells includes a nearly complete biography and several articles on Wells' life in the 19th century.

In addition to the lecture, a small exhibit of Wells' autograph writings and journals, provided by the Harold B. Lee Library's Special Collections, will be located in the auditorium's foyer.

The Alice Louise Reynolds Lecture Series was established in her honor and features prominent guest speakers in literature, bibliography and public service. It is through the generosity of members of the Alice Louise Reynolds Clubs and other Friends of the Library that the endowment for this annual lectureship has been made possible.

For more information, contact Brian Champion at (801) 422-5862.

Writer: Liesel Enke

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