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Intellect

Economist Gregg Easterbrook at BYU forum Sept. 20

Gregg Easterbrook, nationally recognized author and economist, will speak at a Brigham Young University forum Tuesday, Sept. 20, at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center.

Easterbrook’s address, “The Global Economy: What’s Next” will cover what businesses in a global economy can expect in the future.

The forum will be broadcast live on KBYU-TV (Channel 11), BYU Television, KBYU-FM (89.1), BYU Radio and byubroadcasting.org. For rebroadcast and archive information, visit byub.org/devotionals or speeches.byu.edu.

Easterbrook is a contributing editor of The Atlantic Monthly,The New Republic and The Washington Monthly, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution, and a distinguished fellow of the Fulbright Foundation.

His primary contributions focus on national politics and policy. He has also written on a wide range of topics including weapons systems, labor negotiations, poverty, electric power and the search for extraterrestrial life.  He writes the “Tuesday Morning Quarterback” column for ESPN.com.

For more information, contact Kirsten Thompson at (801) 422-4331.

Writer: Melissa Connor

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