Skip to main content
Intellect

Discounted registration available to faculty/staff for Rootstech Conference March 21-23

Early registration for Rootstech, a family history and technology conference cosponsored by Brigham Young University Conferences and Workshops, has opened to the public with discounts available to qualifying BYU faculty and staff. The conference will be held March 21-23, 2013, in Salt Lake City at the Salt Palace Convention Center.

To register through BYU, visit ce.byu.edu/cw/rootstech.

In its third year, the conference will include a new “Getting Started” track for those new to family history, a track dedicated to technology developers and an opening social at The Leonardo – Utah’s contemporary science, technology and art museum.

Additionally, the conference will include an expanded Expo Hall with new exhibits for learning about the latest products and services and a “Developer Day” where technology developers can gather inspiration and ideas from technology end users.

The conference is open to all ages and at all levels of family history or technological expertise. Full three-day passes, single-day passes, student three-day passes and early bird passes are all available at varying costs.

For more information about the Rootstech conference, visit rootstech.org.

Writer: Preston Wittwer

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
February 23, 2021
Dr. Dambisa Moyo, a Zambian-born international economist who analyzes macroeconomics and global affairs, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on the macroeconomic, geopolitical and social trends defining our world.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
February 23, 2021
Leaders of U.S. Special Operations Command have turned to the expertise of two Brigham Young University professors for advice on the high-stakes ethical dilemmas their forces face.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
February 12, 2021
The study found that fathers who had more sons were more likely to vote for a stronger national government than fathers of daughters, who preferred a weaker national government with greater state authority.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=