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Intellect

CANCELED: March 17 BYU organ recital to celebrate Bach's 327th birthday

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED:

Brigham Young University School of Music faculty artist Douglas E. Bush will perform an organ recital commemorating Johann Sebastian Bach’s 327th birthday Saturday, March 17, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

This event is free and the public is welcome.

The program features a variety of Bach's compositions, including preludes and fugues, chorale-based works (i.e., pieces abased on hymns) and the Fantasia in C Minor.

Born and raised in western Montana, Bush is a professor of music at BYU specializing in keyboard studies. He graduated from BYU in 1972 and earned a master’s degree from BYU in 1974 and a doctorate from the University of Texas at Austin in 1982.

He has performed extensively in the United States, Mexico and Europe and has been a featured soloist in several concert series. He has conducted numerous master classes and workshops on organ literature, church music and the music of Bach, and he has published both organ and choral music for church use.

He is the editor an encyclopedia on the organ to be published by Routledge Press in New York City.

For more information about this organ recital, contact Douglas E. Bush at (801) 422-3159 or douglas_bush@byu.edu.

 

Writer: Melissa Connor

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