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Intellect

BYU's Lynn Callister to address United Nations Commission on Status of Women

Will discuss maternal healthcare issues in developing nations

Lynn C. Callister of the Brigham Young University College of Nursing faculty has been invited to speak to the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women in New York City on March 4, 2004.

Callister will also give this presentation at BYU on March 26 at 1 p.m. in 115 McKay Education Building. Her campus address will be co-sponsored by BYU's Women’s Research Institute and the College of Nursing. The public is welcome to attend.

The World Family Policy Center at BYU is facilitating Callister’s presentation to the United Nations.

“The United States Mission to the United Nations asked us to find someone with an expertise in maternal healthcare in the developing world. We couldn’t have found someone with better qualifications,” said Richard Wilkins, director of the World Family Policy Center. “Representatives from more than 100 nations will meet to set international priorities for women’s issues. Dr. Callister’s research can have a profound effect on the health of women worldwide.”

Callister has studied women’s issues throughout the world and worked to improve healthcare conditions in developing countries.

“Every minute of every day, a woman dies as a result of pregnancy or childbirth somewhere in the world," Callister said. "Each year these women leave at least one million motherless children who are then at increased risk for mortality because of the loss of their primary caregiver.”

According to Wilkins, basic healthcare doesn’t get the international attention that it deserves, and Callister will have the opportunity to highlight this critical need.

“This group is very influential in setting international norms,” he said. Only a select few professionals from all over the world are invited to present during the two-week conference.

Writer: Garnet Stanger

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