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Intellect

BYU's Charles Redd Center seeks stories on Church sport programs

The Charles Redd Center for Western Studies at Brigham Young University is studying all aspects of sports in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, with a special focus on the all-Church basketball tournament.

The center is looking for individuals who have stories to share through oral history interviews, manuscripts, autobiographies or responses via E-mail for its newest research project.

If you have stories you would be willing to share, please contact Jessie L. Embry, assistant director, Charles Redd Center, 5437 HBLL, BYU, Provo, UT 84602; by E-mail at jle3@email.byu.edu or leave a message at (801) 422-7585.

From 1922 to 1970 the Church of Jesus Christ sponsored a basketball tournament, which Church leaders declared to be the largest in the world. Teams competed on ward, stake and regional levels and the top teams came to Salt Lake City for the all-Church tournament.

Even World War II did not stop the tournament, although it limited the number of teams that could participate. At the height of the tournament, in the '50s and '60s, teams came from throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico to participate.

The Church also sponsored all-Church tournaments in other sports during the same period.

Writer: Elizabeth B. Jensen

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