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Intellect

BYU Wind Symphony, Symphonic Band plan Dec. 6 concert

The Brigham Young University Wind Symphony and Symphonic Band will be performing their final concerts of the year Tuesday, Dec. 6 at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

Tickets are $10 with $1 off for seniors and alumni and $4 off for students. Tickets are available at the Harris Fine Arts Ticket Office, 801-422-4322, online at byuarts.com/tickets or at the door.

The Symphonic Band will start the concert with a performance of “Pictures at an Exhibition” by Modest Moussorgsky conducted by Kirt Saville. After intermission the Wind Symphony will perform Bernstein’s “Overture to Candide” before Kory Katseanes, guest conductor, leads them in Paul Hindemith’s “March.”

The BYU Wind Symphony, directed by Donald Peterson, is comprised of the finest woodwind, brass and percussion players at the university and has an extremely active concert season.

The Symphonic Band is conducted by Kirt Saville and uses a full concert band instrumentation of approximately 85 musicians. The group performs significant literature from a variety of musical periods in each concert, and they have given premieres to various works for the wind band.

For more information contact Ken Crossley at (801) 422-9348 or ken_crossley@byu.edu.

Writer: Charles Krebs

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