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Intellect

BYU Wind Symphony in concert Dec. 5

The Brigham Young University Wind Symphony conducted by Donald Peterson will present a concert on Wednesday, Dec. 5, at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

Admission will be $10, or $7 with a BYU or student ID. Tickets can be purchased at the Fine Arts Ticket Office, by calling (801) 422-4322 or by visiting performances.byu.edu.

The program will include “Rocky Point Holiday” by Ron Nelson, “Diversion for Band” by Gaylen Hatton, “O Magnum Mysterium” by Morten Lauridsen, “Shadow Dance” by David Dzubay and “Dance of the Jesters” by Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky.

The ensemble will also perform “Desi” by Michael Daugherty, “Canzona” by Peter Mennin, “Korean Dances” by Chang Su Koh and “The Pines of Rome” by Ottorino Resphigi.

The BYU Wind Symphony, consisting of 47 top student brass, woodwind and percussion instrumentalists, plays a kaleidoscope of band music. The band has toured internationally to Great Britain, Asia, Australia and New Zealand.

For more information, contact Donald Peterson at (801) 422-7275.

Writer: Aaron Searle

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