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Intellect

BYU Theatre announces 2013-2014 season

Includes "Light in the Piazza," "Cymbaline," "Pride and Prejudice"

The Brigham Young University Theatre and Media Arts Department has announced its 2013–2014 theatre season.

Season renewals and new orders are available. Visit  byuarts.com  to download the order form. Single tickets go on sale approximately four weeks prior to each event. For ticket information, contact the Fine Arts Ticket Office at (801) 422-4322 or visit  byuarts.com/tickets .

Each major production will have an evening featuring American Sign Language translation. There will be no performances Sundays or Mondays.

Fall 2013

The season will begin with “The Nightingale,based on the story by Hans Christian Andersen and adapted for the stage by Timothy Mason, Sept. 27-Oct. 12 in the Margetts Theatre. Directed by Julia Ashworth and Kori Wakamatsu, this tale of an emperor who neglects the lyrical song of a humble nightingale for the artificial splendor of a mechanical bird vividly depicts the majesty, grace and poetic ritual of ancient China. Performed in English and Mandarin and influenced by the traditions of Peking Opera, “The Nightingale” invites audience members to ponder the worth of the things we value most. “Do not be deceived by glitter and show. A true voice and a gentle heart are all you will ever need.”

“The Light in the Piazza” will play Nov. 15-Dec. 7 in the Pardoe Theatre. Directed by Scott Eckern, the play opens in 1953 in Italy when a wealthy American and her daughter set out to explore an Italian piazza (town square) filled with art, history and sunlight. When a summer breeze whisks the girl’s hat into the hands of a handsome young Florentine, the resulting encounter sparks an unexpected romance, forcing the mother to reconsider not only her daughter’s future but her own life’s dreams — and regrets. Featuring a rich musical score by Adam Guettel, the grandson of Broadway composer Richard Rodgers, “The Light in the Piazza” explores love in its most tender and complicated forms.

Winter 2014

William Shakespeare’s “Cymbeline” will open the winter semester theatre season Jan. 31-Feb. 8 in the Margetts Theatre. Lightheartedly adapted (twice) and directed by Teresa Dayley Love, Shakespeare’s adventurous romance gets the double treatment — and a happy ending — in two special adaptations: as a fairy tale suited for youngsters and as a noir mystery perfect for the young-at-heart. Exploring the Bard’s common themes of mistaken identity, innocence wronged and jealousy, “Cymbeline” tells the story of a princess in a pickle, her banished husband, a villainous queen and “a whole lotta mayhem” in Britain. Caution: audience participation ahead!

“A Man for All Seasons” will continue the season March 7-22 in the Margetts Theatre. Directed by David Morgan, the play demonstrates how conscience and corruption collide in the powerful historical portrait of Sir Thomas More — counselor to King Henry VIII and Lord Chancellor of England. More resists entreaties to condone the king’s divorce from Catherine of Aragon, marriage to Anne Boleyn and separation from the Catholic Church in Rome. Though he is ultimately condemned by his silence, his unwavering dedication to principle makes him a true “man for all seasons.”

Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” will be on stage March 21-April 4 in the Pardoe Theatre. In celebration of the 200th anniversary of the publication of this favorite story of love, manners and social status in 19th-century England, BYU Theatre presents a newly commissioned stage adaptation of Austen’s seminal work. Laugh, cry and delight with the quick-witted Elizabeth Bennet and her sisters as they search for love. After all, “a lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.” The play is adapted for the stage by Melissa Leilani Larson and directed by Barta Heiner.

Spring 2014

The theatre season will conclude with “The Selfish Giant” May 30-June 7 in the Pardoe Theatre. In this allegorical play about Jesus’s love, adapted for the stage by Teresa Dayley Love and directed by Jennifer and Nat Reed from a children’s story by Oscar Wilde, a self-centered giant learns about friendship, faith and the power to change.  At first unwilling to share his beautiful garden with the children who long to play in it, the giant finds happiness when he welcomes the youngsters onto his patch of earth, which causes his garden to blossom and thrive. Using puppets and live actors, BYU Theatre presents a unique look at this poignant tale.

Special Events:

“Greek Theatre Festival: Oedipus the King” will play Sept. 23 at 5 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

Short Play Festival, featuring work written by BYU playwriting students and staged by student directors, will be Oct. 25-Nov. 2 at 7 p.m. in the Nelke Theatre.

BFA Senior Showcase featuring BYU’s top music-dance-theatre students will be held April 8-9 at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. in the Nelke Theatre.  

Final Cut Film Festival will run April 11-12 in the Pardoe Theatre.

For more information, contact the Fine Arts Ticket Office at (801) 422-4322.

Writer: Hwa Lee

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