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Intellect

BYU students take top honors at national microbiology meet

Students from the Microbiology and Molecular Biology Department at Brigham Young University took top honors at the joint meeting of the Rocky Mountain Virology Club and the American Society for Microbiology (Rocky Mountain Branch) Oct. 6-8 at Colorado State University.

Three students from faculty member Kim O’Neill’s cancer research team, Keith Wells, Justin Robinson and Kendal Jensen, placed first, second and third, respectively. The winning students were awarded cash prizes.

Graduate and undergraduate students from across the Rocky Mountain region presented research findings during the three-day meeting. This was the BYU department’s first time attending the meeting.

For more information, contact Anna Rose Johnson at either (801) 422-2479 or mmbiopr@byu.edu.

Writer: Brooke Eddington

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