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Intellect

BYU student receives national security education scholarship

Clay Adair, a senior at Brigham Young University, has been awarded the National Security Education Program David L. Boren Undergraduate Scholarship.

Adair, who is majoring in Middle Eastern Studies/Arabic, was selected to receive the scholarship along with 140 other students. The pool of applicants included 729 applicants nationwide, eight of whom were from BYU.

The scholarship is designed to assist students interested in studying world regions that are critical to U.S. interests, and provides up to $20,000 for these students to study abroad. Adair will spend the 2007-2008 school year at the American University in Cairo to study at the Arabic Language Institute.

Adair’s acceptance of the scholarship commits him to work for a United States federal government department or agency for at least one year after completion of his education, with the expectation that he will utilize the language and regional expertise he gains as a result of the scholarship in his work.

For more information, contact Cory Leonard at cory_leonard@byu.edu.

Writer: Aaron Searle

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