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Intellect

BYU screens "Treasure of the Sierra Madre" Jan. 27

Humphrey Bogart stars in B. Traven's tale of three down-and-out prospectors in Mexico during the 1920s in "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre," showing at Brigham Young University's Harold B. Lee Library auditorium Thursday, Jan. 27 at 7 p.m.

Doors open at 6:30. Admission is free, but seating is limited. Children 8 years and older are welcome. No food or drink is permitted in the auditorium.

Critics hailed tough guy Humphrey Bogart's portrayal of the greedy Fred C. Dobbs as the best of his career. The 1948 film was directed by Bogart's good friend John Huston, whose father (Walton Huston) plays the senior partner of the gold-prospecting trio that also includes Tim Holt.

Both father and son picked up Academy Awards on Oscar night in 1949, Walter for Best Supporting Actor and John for both Best Director and Best Screenplay. The musical score was by Max Steiner, whose papers are preserved in the L. Tom Perry Special Collections in the Lee Library.

The showing of "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre" is part of the ongoing Special Collections Motion Picture Archives Film Series, co-sponsored by the Friends of the Harold B. Lee Library and Dennis and Linda Gibson. The motion pictures presented in the series come from the library's permanent collection of motion picture prints. Online access to the season schedule for the series is at sc.lib.byu.edu.

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