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Intellect

BYU School of Music presents "Opera Scenes" Feb. 18-26

A student ensemble from the Brigham Young University School of Music will present “Opera Scenes,” an evening of dramatic Italian and French opera pieces, Friday, Feb. 18, through Saturday, Feb. 26, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Tickets are on sale at byuarts.com/tickets and (801) 422-4322 for $6 a seat. There will be no performances Sunday, Monday or Thursday.

BYU’s Opera Ensemble, which performs each fall, winter and spring, is focusing on Italian opera for its winter performance. Pieces come from the bel canto repertoire of the first half of the 19th century from the composers Rossini, Donizetti and Bellini.

While cast members and program selections will vary each night, works to be performed in Italian include “The Barber of Seville,” “Cinderella,” “Don Pasquale” and “The Sleep Walker” and in French “The Daughter of the Regiment” and “The Elixir of Love.” A finale piece called “Chi Mi Frena in Tal Momento?” (“Who Restrains Me at Such a Moment?”) from the tragic Italian opera “Lucia di Lammermoor” will also be performed.

For more information about the concert, contact director Lawrence Vincent at (801) 422-3165 or lawrence_vincent@byu.edu, or visit byuarts.com.

Writer: Philip Volmar

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