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Intellect

BYU political science honor society wins national award

The Brigham Young University chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha (PSA), the political science honor society, was named Best Chapter for the 2002-2003 school year by the national PSA office.

This award recognizes BYU's Beta Mu chapter for extraordinary levels of activity during the past year.

Beta Mu was also honored with this award in 1999, giving it the unusual distinction of being a two-time winner.

Under the direction of president Jenny Champoux and faculty advisor Dr. Darren Hawkins, the Beta Mu chapter succeeded in its three-fold mission for the 2002-2003 academic year.

First, it emphasized the importance of academic discussion and learning. Second, it improved faculty involvement in all activities, to foster closer faculty-student relationships and third, it encouraged social interaction, helping members forge bonds of friendship.

In coordination with the International Studies Honors Society (Sigma Iota Rho), Beta Mu annually publishes "Sigma: A Journal of Political and International Studies." From the 40 papers submitted this year, the "Sigma" committee selected, edited and published six papers on various political and international topics.

Writer: Jenny Champoux

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