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Intellect

BYU plans Eleventh Annual Economic Self-Reliance Conference Nov. 6-7

The Eleventh Annual Economic Self-Reliance Conference will bring together social entrepreneurs to address domestic and international poverty and economic development Thursday and Friday, Nov. 6 and 7, at Brigham Young University’s Conference Center.

John Hatch, founder of FINCA International, will present a special microcredit seminar explaining issues surrounding micro finance issues and the methodology of village banking. FINCA International is an organization that provides financial services to the working poor in developing countries.

Sponsored by the BYU Center for Economic Self-Reliance, the conference will include panels and discussion sessions covering such topics as adult literacy, microcredit, micro franchising, ethnographic studies and best practices in forming mutually beneficial partnerships with businesses, schools, governments and nonprofits.

Registration discounts are available for early registrants, large groups and college or high school students. Registration includes a one-year subscription to ESR Review. Visit ce.byu.edu/cw/esr for registration and a complete conference schedule.

Writer: Brady Toone

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