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Intellect

BYU Piano Duo to present free recital Sept. 2

The Brigham Young University Piano Duo, comprised of Jeffrey Shumway and Del Parkinson, will perform a guest artist recital Friday, Sept. 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall at Brigham Young University.

The event is free and the public is invited to attend.

The duo will perform “Danse Macabre” by Camille Saint-Saens, “Etude in the Form of a Canon” by Robert Schumann and Claude Debussy, “Fantasy on George Gershwin’s ‘Porgy & Bess’” by Percy Grainger, “Rondo” by Frédéric Chopin, “Toccata” by Henryk Górecki and “Scaramouche” by Darius Milhaud.

Shumway is a member of the music faculty at BYU, serving as professor of piano and as head of keyboard studies. He received his bachelor of music degree in 1976 from BYU. His further studies included a master of music degree at the Juilliard School of Music, where he studied with Irwin Freundlich. Shumway also received a doctor of music degree from Indiana University in 1981.

He has performed regularly since 1983 with his duo-piano partner, Parkinson, who is a member of the music faculty at Boise State University. They recorded a compact disc, “Celebrating Gershwin,” in 1998.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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