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Intellect

BYU museum hosts mystery date night March 19-20

Brigham Young University’s Museum of Peoples and Cultures will host a mystery date night where couples will team up to solve “The Disappearance of the Parrot Jar” Friday and Saturday, March 19-20, beginning at 6 p.m.

Tickets for the date night are $24 per couple and will include dinner. They can be purchased at the Wilkinson Student Center Information Desk beginning March 15.

Participants will immerse themselves in character personalities and work as detectives to discover who "stole" a valuable artifact from the museum’s exhibition. Identity profiles are assigned to each individual when tickets are purchased. Profiles will include a brief history of the character’s background along with costume suggestions.

“The mystery dinner is always so much fun,” said Anna McKean, promotions manager at the museum. “It gives couples the chance to step out of reality for a bit and just have a good time while learning about the intricacies of a museum.”

The date night will begin with a tour of the “crime scene” where the artifact was stolen. The mystery will then unfold over dinner, as clues are revealed and accusations made. Each character is a suspect in the mystery, and all must prove their innocence to the other participants.

For more information, visit contact Anna McKean at (801) 422-0020 or visit mpc.byu.edu.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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