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Intellect

BYU Museum of Art patrons enjoy Monday night story-telling activities

Every Monday night at Brigham Young University's Museum of Art auditorium, people of all ages can enjoy "Artful Tales," storytelling focused on the "Art of the Ancient Mediterranean World: Egypt, Greece, Rome" exhibition now on display.

The "Artful Tales" program is free and offers two 35-minute presentations every Monday night at 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. The 7 p.m. presentation is geared toward families from the community and the 8 p.m. presentation is geared toward university students.

"Many people believe that storytelling is only for children, but that is a misconception," said Rosemarie Howard, "Artful Tales" coordinator. "Stories help define who we are. They help us see how our world intersects with the worlds of others. Stories help us connect emotionally with people and events of the past and present."

Each month has a theme the stories depict. The theme for Sept. is "A Harvest of Greek Myth," and the October theme, inspired by Halloween, is "Mummies, Monsters, and-Cats?"

The goal of this program is to help people develop a better connection with and understanding of Greek beliefs.

For more information, contact the BYU Museum of Art at (801) 422-1140.

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