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Intellect

BYU Museum of Art offers Victorian Film Series beginning March 14

In conjunction with “Masterworks of Victorian Art from the Collection of John H. Schaeffer”

Beginning Friday, March 14, the Brigham YoungUniversity Museum of Art will offer a four-week Victorian film series inconjunction with its current exhibit, “Masterworks of Victorian Art from theCollection of John H. Schaeffer.”

Film screenings will begin at 7 p.m. each Friday nightin the MOA Auditorium. Admission is free and open to the public.

The series will include classic films that addressVictorian-era stereotypes. BYU theatre and media arts professor Dean Duncanwill introduce the films, setting the stage by providing background informationto help viewers appreciate the films within their original contexts. The filmsin the series are:

• March14: “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” (1932)

•March 21: “The Picture of Dorian Gray” (1945)

•March 28: “Great Expectations” (1946)

• April 4: “The Importance of Being Earnest” (1952)

For more information, contact the BYU Museum ofArt at (801) 422-8287.

Writer: Brenna Jackson

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