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BYU Men's, Women's Choruses plan joint concerts Nov. 7-8

Brigham Young University’s Men’s Chorus and Women’s Choruses will come together for a joint fall concert Friday and Saturday, Nov. 7-8, at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center.

Tickets are $6 and can be purchased at the Fine Arts Ticket Office by calling (801) 422-4322 or by visiting byuarts.com.

The concert will feature the debut of the Women’s Chorus solo recording that will be officially released Nov. 11. The CD, “Wondrous Love,” will be available for sale after the concert, at the BYU Bookstore and at tantararecords.com.

“Jean Applonie and recording engineer Jon Holloman are to be congratulated, as are the performers, whose focus and spirit can be heard in the spontaneous shout at the end of this recording when through a talkback mike engineer Holloman says, ‘Amen, sisters!’” said Ron Simpson, Tantara Records general manager.

The Men’s Chorus, conducted by Rosalind Hall, will feature a lively set of Welsh folk songs that premiered during BYU’s Homecoming Spectacular.

They will perform “Sing Unto God” by G. F. Handel, “Where the Old Ohio Flows” by Lon Beery and “Inside Out & Kicking — A Festival of Welsh Folksongs” arranged by Daniel McDavitt.

The Women’s Chorus, conducted by Jean Applonie, will present a set of charming “princess pieces” from the world of Walt Disney. The “Parade of Princesses” will include “Belle” from Beauty and the Beast, “Sing Sweet Nightingale” from Cinderella and “A Whole New World” from Aladdin.

Their performance will also feature “Peace Like a River” arranged by Joan Szymko; “I’ll Go Where You Want Me to Go” by Carrie E. Rounsefell, arranged by Applonie; and “Nine Hundred Miles,” an American folk song arranged by Philip E. Silvey.

The choruses will be accompanied by the BYU Honor’s Wind Quintet featuring Annie Elmer on flute, Rebecca Tittelfitz on oboe, Kenji Hood on horn, Katie Nibley on bassoon and Daniel Bailey on clarinet.

The Men’s Chorus, founded by Ralph Woodward in 1958, performs pieces for male voices from all time periods, as well as folk songs, religious compositions and contemporary arrangements.

The Women’s Chorus is known for performing pieces ranging from the medieval and Renaissance periods up to modern masterpieces. The chorus also specializes in folk music and spirituals

For more information, contact Rosalind Hall at (801) 422-2272 or Jean Applonie at (801) 422-7495.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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