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Intellect

BYU Marriott School rises in Financial Times rankings

School recognized for education and salary increases

The Financial Times of London advanced Brigham Young University's Marriott School of Management for the second consecutive year in the paper's global ranking of the top 100 master of business administration programs.

The Marriott School ranked 51st this year, compared with 63rd in 2002 and 75th in 2001.

In addition to the overall ranking, the school's alumni placed its finance program among the top 10 worldwide. The Marriott School also placed among the top 10 schools in North America for salary percentage increase - calculated from students' salaries at the beginning of the MBA to three years after graduation, computed as a weighted average of responses from the 2001, 2002 and 2003 surveys.

"We're pleased with the recognition that BYU and the Marriott School continue to receive from the Financial Times and other prominent business school rankings," said Merrill J. Bateman, BYU president. "The recognition is evidence of the school's strong academics and our graduates' ability to add value to companies and organizations around the world."

This is the fifth year the Financial Times has ranked business schools. The paper's criteria measure a school's strength in three areas-purchasing power in the marketplace, diversity of experience and the school's research qualities.

The rankings are compiled from two questionnaires and an independent assessment of research. One questionnaire was completed by alumni who graduated three years ago in 1999. A second questionnaire was completed by each school. The paper evaluated business schools on six continents for its 2003 MBA rankings published 20 January.

"One of the greatest attractions to recruiters is the high caliber of our students and their unique international perspective," said Ned C. Hill, Marriott School dean. "We also attribute our success to wonderful alumni who stepped up their support and help with placement in a difficult economy."

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