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Intellect

BYU life sciences students win top prizes at conference

Brigham Young University life sciences students came out on top with a first-place winner and several top-five finishers at the Western Nutrient Management Conference in Salt Lake City in March.

Students competed with an oral synopsis of research and a poster presentation. Emily Buxton, a BYU plant biology student, took first place; Mary Pletsch and Joshua LeMonte, environmental science students, tied for third place; and Kelly Marcroft and Ryan Christensen, landscape management students, took fourth place. In addition, a former BYU environmental soil science student, Kyle Blair, took second place.

“Many participants told me how impressed they were with our students — not only their research, but how they presented it and for themselves,” said Bryan G. Hopkins, associate professor of plant and wildlife sciences. “They deserve a warm congratulations.”

The Western Nutrient Management Conference provides an opportunity to explore current nutrient-related research and exchange ideas and is a forum for research, industry and extension to communicate about nutrient management as it relates to profitability, sustainability and environmental protection.

For more information, contact Bryan G. Hopkins at 801-422-2185.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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