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Intellect

BYU Jazz Legacy welcomes trombonist Dan Barrett for March 1 concert

Brigham Young University’s straw-hatted Jazz Legacy Dixieland Band will be performing in concert Tuesday, March 1, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall. Guest artist Dan Barrett will be featured on trombone.

Tickets are $6 a seat online at byuarts.com/tickets or by phone at (801) 422-4322.
 
The jazz band’s performance comes as part of the BYU School of Music’s “Celebration of Jazz Week,” a series of concerts hosted in the Harris Fine Arts Center during the first week of March. Visit here for a full list of performances.
 
Jazz selections for Tuesday’s concert include tunes by Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington and Jelly Roll Morton. The band is directed by Steve Call.
 
Dan Barrett began playing the trombone at the age of eleven, and the cornet shortly thereafter. Barrett has recorded under his own record label (“Blue Swing” and “Melody In Swing” are his latest albums with Arbors Records) and with many respected jazz artists. In 1999 he was nominated for the Bell Atlantic Jazz Award for “Trombonist of the Year,” and came in on top in a 1999 poll as the Mississippi Rag readership’s “favorite living trombonist.” He is mentioned with high praise in the new Biographical Encyclopedia of Jazz as well as the Guinness “Who’s Who of Jazz.”

Comprised of seven student-musicians, the Jazz Legacy Dixieland Band consists of Jory Woodis, clarinet; Austin Robinson, cornet; Brian Woodbury, trombone; Zach Wiggins, piano; Eric Christensen, banjo and guitar; Aaron Southerland, tuba; and Ryan Gavin, drums.
 
For more information about this concert, contact Steve Call at (801) 422-6116 or steve_call@byu.edu, or visit byuarts.com. To learn more about the Jazz Legacy Dixieland Band, visit http://ce.byu.edu/cw/jazzfestival/jldb.cfm.

Writer: Philip Volmar

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