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Intellect

BYU industrial design student wins national scholarship

The Industrial Designers Society of America awarded Brigham Young University industrial design student Nico Li the IDSA Scholarship of $2,500.

A student from Southern China, Li said his interest in becoming a designer came from using technology such as computers and cell phones and realizing that somebody had to create those products.

The Industrial Designers Society of America awards two scholarships each year to top student designers across the Americas. This is the second time a BYU student has received this scholarship.

BYU industrial design students like Nico work on high-level product development projects for companies, including Dell and Motorola.

For additional information, contact industrial design program chair Paul Skaggs at (801) 422-4420 or paul_skaggs@byu.edu.

Writer: Brady Toone

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