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Intellect

BYU hopes to "CAN the Utes" in annual food drive

It's time to "CAN the Utes" and defeat them during the annual BYU/University of Utah food drive competition, which begins Monday (Nov. 11) and continues through Nov. 23.

The friendly rivalry is conducted through the alumni associations of both schools and benefits food banks throughout Utah. As an incentive to local donors, all food items gathered will stay in the regions where they are donated.

Despite a mighty effort in which 22,000 pounds of food were gathered from BYU in 2001, the university fell short of the 30,000 pounds amassed by the Utes. BYU has won the food drive only once since it started in the mid-'90s.

"This year we have set our goal at 40,000 pounds, and we've made several additions to our marketing plans to help achieve that goal," says Todd Hendricks, program administrator for the food drive. "It's not only a pride thing to beat the Utes-but it's also a way to increase needed supplies in our food banks."

In addition to 75 food bins that will be placed throughout the BYU campus, Novell will coordinate its food drive with BYU and place bins at its corporate offices. The school's two mascots, Cosmo and Swoop, will be on hand to greet Novell employees Monday, Nov. 18, from 8 to 9 a.m. BYU is also working with Convergys and other area businesses to provide bins for the drive.

Smith's Stores in Utah have designated the week of Nov. 16-23 for the food drive. Those who give a dollar to the cause will have their names placed on the school color of their choice, where it will be displayed on store walls during that week. All the monies gathered will be used for the local United Way food pantries. (Not wanting to offend Utah State University fans, however, Smith's has opted not to include its Brigham City and Logan stores in the food drive.)

Many BYU clubs and colleges will assist with the drive, and the Student Alumni Association will put on a student dance Nov. 15 beginning at 8 p.m. in 3220 WSC. The price of admission is two cans of food. Also accepted will be non-perishable, non-glass containers that contain such items as macaroni and cheese. Especially welcome are chili, stew, soups, peanut butter and nutrient-dense foods.

In addition to the BYU Alumni Association, the drive is getting support from the university's Jacobsen Center for Service and Learning.

Further information about the competition is available by calling Hendricks at 422-7621 or by email, todd_hendricks@byu.edu.

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