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Intellect

BYU grant program helps train ethnically diverse special education teachers

The Department of Counseling Psychology and Special Education at Brigham Young University received a federal grant to help tuition needs for those who are ethnically diverse, with disabilities or bilingual who are interested in becoming licensed special education teachers with endorsements in English as a Second Language.

Recipients of tuition support are required to dedicate two years teaching special education in the United States for every year of support they receive.

Bilingual special educators are in great need because it is difficult for non-English speaking children to learn English while facing academic challenges in school.

Research has shown that it takes five to seven years for non-English speakers to learn English well enough to become proficient in the academic language.

Those who already hold a bachelor's degree may apply for licensure and attend the evening school program.

For applications for the summer program visit http://www.byu.edu/cse/.

For more information contact Lynn Wilder at (801) 422-1237 or at lynn_wilder@byu.edu.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

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