Skip to main content
Intellect

BYU grant program helps train ethnically diverse special education teachers

The Department of Counseling Psychology and Special Education at Brigham Young University received a federal grant to help tuition needs for those who are ethnically diverse, with disabilities or bilingual who are interested in becoming licensed special education teachers with endorsements in English as a Second Language.

Recipients of tuition support are required to dedicate two years teaching special education in the United States for every year of support they receive.

Bilingual special educators are in great need because it is difficult for non-English speaking children to learn English while facing academic challenges in school.

Research has shown that it takes five to seven years for non-English speakers to learn English well enough to become proficient in the academic language.

Those who already hold a bachelor's degree may apply for licensure and attend the evening school program.

For applications for the summer program visit http://www.byu.edu/cse/.

For more information contact Lynn Wilder at (801) 422-1237 or at lynn_wilder@byu.edu.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

Forum: Building the beloved community

October 26, 2021
Rev. Dr. Andrew Teal, a chaplain and Fellow at Pembroke College, delivered the forum address to campus on Tuesday. He spoke on building a beloved community — the theme for this year’s forums.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

New personal branding course educating BYU student-athletes on business in the time of NIL

October 26, 2021
Class teaches principles of success for life beyond college athletics
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

A megafire induced over a century’s worth of erosion near Utah Lake — but there’s more to the story, say BYU scientists

October 22, 2021
In burned watersheds where the wildfire had consumed stabilizing vegetation and leaf litter, the rain had caused massive erosion. There was a 2,000-fold increase in sediment flux compared to unburned areas, creating a plume of ash and soil moving into Utah Lake that was visible from space.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=