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Intellect

BYU Geography Department host Chauncey Harris Lecture Nov. 16

“The Impossible Capital: Rome under Liberal and Fascist Regimes, 1870-1943”

The Chauncy Harris Distinguished Lecture, sponsored by the Department of Geography and the College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences at Brigham Young University, will be delivered on Thursday, Nov. 16 at 11 a.m. in 250 Spencer W. Kimball Tower.

John Agnew, visiting from the University of California, Los Angeles, will present “The Impossible Capital: Rome under Liberal and Fascist Regimes, 1870-1943.” The lecture will focus on the attempts to turn Rome, the seat of the Roman Catholic Church and the Papal States, into a capital city for a newly unified Italy in 1870.

Agnew is a professor of geography at UCLA who specializes in political geography. He has previously taught at Syracuse University and the University of Chicago. In 2006 he received the Distinguished Scholarship Award from the Association of American Geographers. He has written several books, which include “Hegemony: The New Shape of Global Power,” “Place and Politics in Modern Italy” and “Rome.”

For more information, contact Kim Gibson at (801) 422-1320.

Writer: Brooke Eddington

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