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Intellect

BYU Film Archive to screen "Miracle on 34th Street" Dec. 4

“Miracle on 34th Street,” the 1947 Christmas classic starring Maureen O’Hara and John Payne, will be shown Friday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium as part of the Brigham Young University Motion Picture Archives Film Series.

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Admission is free, but early arrival is encouraged as seating is limited. BYU Motion Picture Archive curator James V. D’Arc will introduce the film.

In “Miracle on 34th Street,” Maureen O’Hara is an advertising executive at Macy’s Department Store and the divorced mother of young Natalie Wood, who is skeptical of the existence of Santa Claus. A young attorney, John Payne, comes along to make his “case” for the warm and generous Kris Kringle. The film earned Academic Awards for the original story and for its screenplay.

The screening is part of the continuing BYU Motion Picture Archive Film Series, co-sponsored by L. Tom Perry Special Collections, the Friends of the Harold B. Lee Library and Dennis and Linda Gibson. All films in the series are original film prints.

For a complete film series schedule, visit sc.lib.byu.edu. For more information, contact James D’Arc at james_darc@byu.edu or (801) 422-6371.

Writer: Ricardo Castro

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