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Intellect

BYU Expert to Speak on Commonalities Among Religions: Faith and Family

People of faith, regardless of religion, generally see their belief as a source of strength for facing the challenges of life. But how does that work? And is it different for each faith?

Brigham Young University School of Family Life Professor David Dollahite and his colleagues interviewed more than 150 families from 14 religious to find the answers to those questions. He will present the findings at a lecture on Thursday, October 22, at 7 p.m., in the 250 Kimball Tower (SWKT) on the BYU campus. The event is free and open to the public.

Over more than a decade, Dollahite and his colleagues interviewed Catholics, Orthodox Christians, Methodists, Lutherans, Baptists, Pentacostals, Church of Christ members, Quakers, Christian Science members, Jehovah?s Witnesses, Latter-day Saints (Mormons), Jews and Sunni and Shi?a Muslim believers. 

Through the analysis the researchers discovered those who possess faith almost always claim a strong allegiance to family as well, yet that allegiance can often be tested by the very possession of faith. He found that families of all religions benefitted from:

  • The ability to unite during challenges, due to a shared vision of family life
  • Identifying processes that lead adolescents to establish strong religious identities and relationships
  • The ability to act on what they believe, together

 

The results of their studies will be released in forthcoming books. At this lecture Dollahite will give a sneak peak of the best practices of religious families.

  • When: Thursday, October 22; 7 p.m.
  • Where: 250 Kimball Tower (SWKT) (see map)
  • Who: David Dollahite, professor, featured in the Deseret News, author of articles on faithful fathering, life coach

 

About the BYU?S College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences

The BYU College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences is composed of departments that study patterns of human behavior from diverse disciplinary approaches. Teaching and scholarship rely on social scientific methodology to learn about human behavior and human societies ? their histories, organization, governments and economies. As the name implies, the college is particularly concerned with studying the family as the basic unit of society. The many institutes and centers within the college provide opportunities for faculty and students to further research and disseminate scholarship.

Students in the college gain a broad education that helps develop an appreciation of the values of modern civilization and prepares them to contribute effectively as citizens. The knowledge and skills gained in the varied disciplines prepare them well for graduate study and professional careers. Many of the departments and programs housed within the college provide opportunities for student learning outside the classroom through internships and faculty-mentored teaching and research experiences.

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