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Intellect

BYU Education in Zion exhibit offers free family home evening tours

The “Education in Zion” exhibit at Brigham Young University will now offer family home evening tours every second and fourth Monday in the Joseph F. Smith Building at 7 p.m.

The tours are free. Large groups are encouraged to make reservations with the gallery Information Desk at (801) 422-6519. Each tour will last about 45 minutes.

“Family Home Evening tours at ‘Education in Zion’ are always fun and informative because the stories from the gallery are memorable,” said Heather Seferovich, gallery curator. The tour will include costumed storytellers who will relate historical stories of education in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the first person.

The gallery and permanent exhibit opened in 2008 and explore a tradition of learning that aims to educate the whole soul by documenting the rich history and heritage of education in the Church.

The exhibit includes inspiring stories shared through film, artwork, photographs and letters, all thoughtfully displayed in the open gallery space with several conversation areas that offer visitors a panoramic view of the Wasatch Mountains.

For more information contact Heather Seferovich at 801-422-3451 or by email at heather_seferovich@byu.edu.

Writer: Melissa Connor

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