Skip to main content
Intellect

BYU education professor honored by national minority association

Brigham Young University professor Tim Smith has received the Emerging Professional Award from the Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues.

The award is given to individuals who have made outstanding contributions in education, research or practice to promote ethnic minority issues within 10 years of their graduation. Smith received the award at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention in San Francisco in August.

Smith is an associate professor in the McKay School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology and Special Education. His research focuses on adapting mental health treatment for non-Caucasian North Americans and increasing life spans for people by means of adequate social support and adapting mental health treatment for non-Caucasian North Americans.  

He obtained his bachelor’s degree in psychology from BYU in 1991. He received a master’s degree in counseling psychology from Utah State University. In 1996, Smith earned a second master’s degree in research psychology from Rhodes University in South Africa. He then returned to USU, where he completed a third master’s degree in sociology and a doctorate in professional psychology.

Smith has taught at BYU since 1999.

Writer: Marissa Ballantyne

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
July 28, 2021
A team of BYU biologists has been tracking dragonflies around the world, from Vietnam to the islands of Vanuatu. Their goal is to piece together the first-ever phylogenic tree of all 6,300 known species and their ancestors.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 27, 2021
Amy Jensen, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on why our bodies matter in today’s digital world. More specifically, she explained that being more intentional about how we use and where we place our bodies can help us grow and cultivate a deeper understanding of others.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 25, 2021
New research finds that children who engaged with princess culture were more likely to hold progressive views about women and subscribe less to attitudes of toxic masculinity.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=