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Intellect

BYU editing students received two national awards for publication

Editing students at Brigham Young University recently received two national awards for their winter 2011 publication of Stowaway Magazine, a student-produced travel publication.

The students received the Bronze Award for “Best Editorial/New Publication” in the Print/Magazine category of the 2011 ContentWise Magnum Opus Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Custom Media and the Award of Excellence for “Custom-Published Magazines and Journals” presented by the 2011 APEX Awards for Publication Excellence.

The niche magazine has been published since January 2010 and aims to inspire the imagination of college-aged readers and encourage them to explore the world, immerse themselves in new cultures and create their own adventures.

The magazine is published as part of a capstone class, and all class members contribute to planning, writing, editing, designing, creating web content and selling ads.

For more information about Stowaway Magazine or the BYU editing minor offered through the Department of Linguistics and English Language, contact Marvin K. Gardner at (801) 422-1253 or marv_gardner@byu.edu, or visit www.stowawaymag.com.

Writer: Melissa Connor

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