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Intellect

BYU Chamber Orchestra concert features Barlow winners March 27

Brigham Young University School of Music Director Kory Katseanes will conduct the Chamber Orchestra in its spring concert Tuesday, March 27, at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall, Harris Fine Arts Center.

For tickets, visit the Fine Arts Tickets Office, byuarts.com/tickets, or call 801-422-4322.

The performance will include the Chamber Symphony No.1, "The Sixth String," by Curtis N. Smith, who was the recipient of the 2011 Barlow Student Composition Award.

The orchestra will also perform the Overture to "Il Signor Bruschino" by Rossini, the Symphony No. 40 in G Minor by Mozart, and "How to Be Spring" by BYU faculty composer Christian Asplund featuring Lawrence Vincent, faculty tenor. Asplund is also a winner of a Barlow Prize.

The Barlow Endowment for Music Composition at BYU encourages and financially supports individuals who demonstrate technical skills and natural gifts for the composition of great music. The endowment achieves this through its Barlow Prize, commissioning programs, and support of student composers.

For more information, contact Ken Crossley, (801) 422-9348, ken_crossley@byu.edu.

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