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Intellect

BYU Bookstore announces annual Photo Competition winners

The BYU Bookstore has announced the winners of its 2008 BYU Bookstore Photo Competition, with winners receiving more than $3,000 in prizes.

The photo competition started at the beginning of the summer and participants were encouraged to take unique pictures that included a BYU Bookstore bag. Participants were motivated by a grand prize of a $1,000 gift card to the BYU Bookstore and other prizes for the runner-up entries, including digital cameras and gift cards from the Bookstore.

The grand-prize winner was Odbayar Parry with her picture of riding a camel in Mongolia. First prize went to Emily Butler who entered a picture of a woman being held up by an elephant’s trunk. While all the entries showed great ideas, the judges felt these two winners showed both creativity and uniqueness, said Rowdy Symons, Bookstore Creative Services manager.

Second-prize winners included pictures of quintuplets, a statue in Jordan and a Buddhist temple in Korea. Other examples included pictures taken of a tomb in France, the Parthenon, the streets of Beijing and using Bookstore bags as a Slip ‘n Slide.

Writer: Anika Prows

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